Anya Taylor-Joy, Edgar Wright’s muse of terror in ‘Last Night in Soho’: “You simulate fear so much that you end up with a panic attack”

The actress of ‘Lady’s Gambit’ stars in the new from the director of ‘Baby Driver’. We spoke to the two of them and Matt Smith and screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns during our stint at the Venice Film Festival. The film opens in theaters this Friday.

Terror has almost always been present in the important moments of Anya Taylor-Joy’s career. Don’t be fooled by his latest work at Peaky Blinders, Lady’s gambit and Emma. It was Robert Eeggers who introduced the actress with a starring role in The witch. Later, the interpreter worked with M. Night Shyamalan in Multiple and Glass (Cristal). To that list, Taylor-Joy can also add Edgar Wright with Last night in Soho. And, again, in the horror genre. Therefore, the actress already has experience in feigning fear in front of the camera.

“There are times when you can simulate panic so much that your body no longer understands that it is not real and you end up having a panic attack because you are doing all the physical signals of someone who is very scared”Taylor-Joy tells SensaCine during our passage through the 78th edition of Venice festival. “You fool yourself in that reality,” adds his co-star Matt Smith.

Last night in Soho opens in theaters this Friday, November 19th. The film follows Eloise, a young woman played by Thomasin McKenzie who goes to London to study fashion design. At night, in her dreams, the protagonist moves to Soho in the 60s. There she meets Sandie, an aspiring singer who is murdered.

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Sandie’s character falls to Taylor-Joy. “I know for a fact that there is a tipping point where I’m not going to stop crying. I cry for hours,” Taylor-Joy continues on getting into character in a horror scene.

As the actress adds:

But around you people are usually very very kind because you are … doing something difficult and scary. So people try to make you laugh and keep you up

While it is her turn to feign terror, Smith has to be scared by playing Jack, a man who seems to have something to do with Sandie’s murder. “If you are not scared or scary, I don’t know if the public would be scared or, at least, would have the experience of feeling that they might be scared”reflects the actor.

WRITING WITH PICTURES AND FITTING ROOM DISAPPOINTMENT

Last night in Soho It’s Wright’s new movie after Baby Driver, released in 2017 and with a great reception from critics. To bring his latest project to the big screen, the director of Scott Pilgrim vs. the world and the Cornetto Trilogy, worked closely with screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns.

“It is important to write visually, especially for something like Last night in Soho“says Wilson-Cairns. Wright’s film, as you can see in the trailer, not only draws attention for its story, but also for its images. Hence, having the visual part in mind was another ingredient during creation of the libretto. “That’s one of the good things when you’re working with a director, that they can describe what they’re seeing in their heads and then there’s the process of doing it.”.

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Wright acknowledges that the images were present during the writing process, but “in the form of a sketchbook”. “When it comes to writing, I think the way I write … I have sometimes scribbled things to explain something. So if we work together and I have an idea of ​​what it might look like and maybe it’s hard to come up with she directly, sometimes I draw something, like an idea or something, “adds the director.

Unlike other films, Wright acknowledges that there are no deleted scenes in Last night in Soho that you would have liked to leave in the final assembly.

As the director explains:

You get used to disappointment when you’re working in the cutting room. The final script is the edit and you see what you recorded. When you remove a scene that you wrote with love, it is like an amputation, in the sense that it is painful for about five minutes. Then you think, ‘Wow, I feel so much better now

Check out our interview with the Last Night in Soho team on these lines, and then check out the trailer for the film.

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